#29: Activist Educators

September is a great time to look at our syllabi, course designs, our delivery strategies, and our degree programs with fresh eyes.  Often, when we undertake this kind of review, we tend to focus on what’s missing, what doesn’t work. Carey Borkoski of Johns Hopkins University and Brianne Roos of Loyola University – Maryland makeContinue reading “#29: Activist Educators”

#28: Slicing the Creative Pie (Summer Shorts)

Technology is disrupting academia in many ways, including the question of who owns course content and other intellectual property. Duplication of digital resources is easy to do and difficult to trace. Digitally recorded lectures can be deployed long after the professor has left the institution, or even died. So the issue of control and access is critically important to online instruction, and to all higher ed, in the 21st century.

#27: Everything Old is New Again (Summer Shorts)

The new academic year seems like an opportune time to ask… are online, asynchronous, and hybrid strange new teaching strategies, or are we simply using new terminology to describe familiar techniques?

#24: Chart a Course to Everywhere

There are many reasons to create academic programs that can reach students who are unable to travel to campus. Maybe you’d like to expand the audience for an existing in-person degree, or create an entirely new online offering.  But before you begin this journey there’s something you need to know — when geography is noContinue reading “#24: Chart a Course to Everywhere”

#8: Anytime, Anywhere

Michael Carey, chair of the Department of Organizational Leadership in the School of Leadership Studies at Gonzaga University, discusses how leadership is learned through an online curriculum, as well as the importance of online communication skills and how they carry over to professional work. 

#7: Studio Matters

Moving a lecture from face-to-face classroom to virtual conferencing is a pretty straight-forward conversion. That doesn’t mean the switch is seamless or ideal, but it is feasible. Activities that are inherently welded to synchronous delivery in a physical space, like studio and field trips… that’s a different story. Or is it? While we’re on thatContinue reading “#7: Studio Matters”

#6: From Campus to Cloud

Now that many institutions have closed the book on their spring term, educators may finally have some time to catch their breath, reflect on the emergency remote instruction experience, and think about how to prepare for various teaching contingencies in the fall. What better time to talk with an experienced educator on the front lineContinue reading “#6: From Campus to Cloud”

#5: Newly Minted

Olivia Marcucci offers her perspectives as a newly minted PhD who accepted a full-time faculty position with the Johns Hopkins School of Education’s online Doctor of Education program, where she teaches educational and racial equity.

#4: A Quick Pivot

Wired Ivy’s own Kieran Lindsey, whose experiences in online higher education include time as a graduate student, an instructor, and currently as program director, has seven questions new-to-online faculty should as they prepare to switch courses to remote instruction.

#3: Connecting the Dots

Last week, we talked about the value of virtual learning communities to help students and faculty feel engaged and supported. Now we’re shifting from theory to practice, sharing some of the things we’ve tried and continue to use in class. We’re hoping listeners will follow our lead and help us make this a conversation byContinue reading “#3: Connecting the Dots”